Hillsdale Magazine

  • September 26, 2018

    Peter Highlander, DPM, MS

    Peter Highlander, ’07, is a founding member of the American Orthopedic Society of 3-D Printing. A reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon in Bellevue, Ohio, he has made headlines recently for his custom 3-D printed implants. “Six months ago, I performed the first total custom ankle replacement in the state of Ohio,” Highlander says, “and from there I have done many other custom bone and joint replacements including metatarsals, navicular, and custom deformity corrections.” The ankle-replacement patient, a healthy woman in her 30s with a deformed ankle resulting from a motor vehicle accident, had been told by numerous doctors that amputation was the only option. But within months after Highlander’s surgery, she was walking normally. After graduating from Hillsdale, Highlander received his doctorate and master’s degrees from Barry University in Miami Shores, Florida, and completed his residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He has written a dozen peer-reviewed journal articles and has been invited to co-author a textbook. He is the director and founder of the Wound Reconstruction Center at Bellevue Hospital, a consultant for two orthopedic implant companies, and an adjunct assistant clinical professor at the Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine. “The expectation of doing well is pretty ubiquitous at Hillsdale,” Highlander says. “I was a chemistry major, which was very difficult, and learning how to write well made me a better medical researcher.” Highlander is married to Lindsey Stevens, ’06, and they have three children. Published in September 2018The post Peter Highlander, DPM, MS appeared first on Hillsdale College.
  • September 26, 2018

    Peter Highlander, DPM, MS

    Peter Highlander, ’07, is a founding member of the American Orthopedic Society of 3-D Printing. A reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon in Bellevue, Ohio, he has made headlines recently for his custom 3-D printed implants. “Six months ago, I performed the first total custom ankle replacement in the state of Ohio,” Highlander says, “and from there I have done many other custom bone and joint replacements including metatarsals, navicular, and custom deformity corrections.” The ankle-replacement patient, a healthy woman in her 30s with a deformed ankle resulting from a motor vehicle accident, had been told by numerous doctors that amputation was the only option. But within months after Highlander’s surgery, she was walking normally. After graduating from Hillsdale, Highlander received his doctorate and master’s degrees from Barry University in Miami Shores, Florida, and completed his residency at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. He has written a dozen peer-reviewed journal articles and has been invited to co-author a textbook. He is the director and founder of the Wound Reconstruction Center at Bellevue Hospital, a consultant for two orthopedic implant companies, and an adjunct assistant clinical professor at the Arizona School of Podiatric Medicine. “The expectation of doing well is pretty ubiquitous at Hillsdale,” Highlander says. “I was a chemistry major, which was very difficult, and learning how to write well made me a better medical researcher.” Highlander is married to Lindsey Stevens, ’06, and they have three children. Published in September 2018The post Peter Highlander, DPM, MS appeared first on Hillsdale College.
  • Marianne Rotole majored in English and minored in history and communications at Hillsdale. She is currently a vice president at Octagon Marketing North America.   HM: Can you briefly describe your post-college career? MR: When I was at Hillsdale I thought I might go into broadcasting or journalism, and I interned at WCSR, the local radio station. After graduation, I moved to Chicago because of its wealth of media outlets. I got an internship at a sports radio station, but quickly realized that was not where I wanted to be. My Hillsdale speech professor, John Lama, had encouraged me to pursue a career in public relations, and I decided to take a one-year internship with the Chicago Bulls’ Media Services Department—this was during the 1996-97 championship season. I then went to work at a PR firm and later accepted an offer to return to the Bulls full-time. After that I worked for the Chicago Marathon for four years, and in 2010 I joined Octagon, an international sports marketing agency, where I currently manage two West Coast-based accounts—Taco Bell and Kaiser Permanente—with regard to their sports sponsorships, with the goal of driving their sales and building their brands.   HM: How has your Hillsdale background most helped your career? MR: For one thing, my Hillsdale education helped me to understand human nature. In my field, it’s critical to understand what motivates people. I also value the communication skills I developed. I interview college graduates these days who cannot speak or write well, both of which are essential in marketing. Hillsdale alumni communicate well; they can back up their arguments concisely, which is critical to the business of articulating ideas, selling services, and reporting meaningful results.   HM: You have served for five years on the Alumni Board Career Services Committee. How...
  • Marianne Rotole majored in English and minored in history and communications at Hillsdale. She is currently a vice president at Octagon Marketing North America.   HM: Can you briefly describe your post-college career? MR: When I was at Hillsdale I thought I might go into broadcasting or journalism, and I interned at WCSR, the local radio station. After graduation, I moved to Chicago because of its wealth of media outlets. I got an internship at a sports radio station, but quickly realized that was not where I wanted to be. My Hillsdale speech professor, John Lama, had encouraged me to pursue a career in public relations, and I decided to take a one-year internship with the Chicago Bulls’ Media Services Department—this was during the 1996-97 championship season. I then went to work at a PR firm and later accepted an offer to return to the Bulls full-time. After that I worked for the Chicago Marathon for four years, and in 2010 I joined Octagon, an international sports marketing agency, where I currently manage two West Coast-based accounts—Taco Bell and Kaiser Permanente—with regard to their sports sponsorships, with the goal of driving their sales and building their brands.   HM: How has your Hillsdale background most helped your career? MR: For one thing, my Hillsdale education helped me to understand human nature. In my field, it’s critical to understand what motivates people. I also value the communication skills I developed. I interview college graduates these days who cannot speak or write well, both of which are essential in marketing. Hillsdale alumni communicate well; they can back up their arguments concisely, which is critical to the business of articulating ideas, selling services, and reporting meaningful results.   HM: You have served for five years on the Alumni Board Career Services Committee. How...
  • September 26, 2018

    Breaking Bread, Building Community

    Lea Jones Hunt, ’13, Feeds Detroit Gather aims to be more than just a restaurant. Tucked in a small storefront in the heart of Detroit’s Eastern Market district, it seeks to draw the community together through locally sourced food, an inviting atmosphere, and charity projects. A marketing/management major at Hillsdale, Lea Jones Hunt, ’13, always wanted to own a business. Halfway through college, Kyle, her high school sweetheart and a student at Lake Superior State, suggested they start a restaurant. “I liked the idea,” Hunt recalls. They married after graduation and worked in California and Chicago before returning to their native Detroit, where they took jobs at Quicken Loans. Yet their dream of starting a restaurant remained a priority. They knew they wanted to be in the Eastern Market district. “It’s the perfect blend of history, culture, and fresh food from the farmers market,” Hunt says. They found a building that had once housed a meatpacking shop and more recently an artist studio. “The building was in good shape, but we had to reconfigure it,” Hunt says. Once they hired a chef, they held “pop-up” dinners in their apartment, experimenting with different menu items before the restaurant opened. It was during one of these dinners that Hunt coined the restaurant’s name. “I knew we should call it Gather,” she says. “We want guests to gather at the table, sharing food and conversation.” Opened in May 2017, Gather offers a seasonal menu. Everything is made from scratch, and most ingredients come from Eastern Market vendors. To support the community, the Hunts began Burger Wednesdays, where guests can enjoy a $5 burger with a donation to that month’s Detroit-based charity. Hunt finds her Hillsdale education helpful in meeting challenges. “My work in Professor King’s marketing classes gave me the confidence to plan...
  • September 26, 2018

    Breaking Bread, Building Community

    Lea Jones Hunt, ’13, Feeds Detroit Gather aims to be more than just a restaurant. Tucked in a small storefront in the heart of Detroit’s Eastern Market district, it seeks to draw the community together through locally sourced food, an inviting atmosphere, and charity projects. A marketing/management major at Hillsdale, Lea Jones Hunt, ’13, always wanted to own a business. Halfway through college, Kyle, her high school sweetheart and a student at Lake Superior State, suggested they start a restaurant. “I liked the idea,” Hunt recalls. They married after graduation and worked in California and Chicago before returning to their native Detroit, where they took jobs at Quicken Loans. Yet their dream of starting a restaurant remained a priority. They knew they wanted to be in the Eastern Market district. “It’s the perfect blend of history, culture, and fresh food from the farmers market,” Hunt says. They found a building that had once housed a meatpacking shop and more recently an artist studio. “The building was in good shape, but we had to reconfigure it,” Hunt says. Once they hired a chef, they held “pop-up” dinners in their apartment, experimenting with different menu items before the restaurant opened. It was during one of these dinners that Hunt coined the restaurant’s name. “I knew we should call it Gather,” she says. “We want guests to gather at the table, sharing food and conversation.” Opened in May 2017, Gather offers a seasonal menu. Everything is made from scratch, and most ingredients come from Eastern Market vendors. To support the community, the Hunts began Burger Wednesdays, where guests can enjoy a $5 burger with a donation to that month’s Detroit-based charity. Hunt finds her Hillsdale education helpful in meeting challenges. “My work in Professor King’s marketing classes gave me the confidence to plan...
  • September 26, 2018

    Understanding America

    Spencer and Bailey Amaral Launch Windrose Project Spencer and Bailey Arlinghaus Amaral, ’14, ’15, aim to teach young Americans about freedom, faith, and virtue through the Windrose Project, a leadership development organization. The project, whose name evokes the directional markings on a compass, sponsors educational seminars, local service projects, and an annual trip to the nation’s capital. Over 2,000 students, ranging in age from 13 to 25, have participated in the project in Chicago, Dallas, Houston, and Los Angeles. Bailey launched the project in 2015 in Texas—where Spencer was enrolled in Dallas Theological Seminary—as a way to teach civics outside the school system. Spencer joined the project in 2016, and soon realized he was in an entirely new teaching environment. “Regardless of whether we’re teaching immigrants or those who were born here, many of our students don’t understand what it means to be an American, because they weren’t taught civics,” Spencer says. “We explore big themes, such as why America is unique as the first country in the world founded on an idea: ‘All men are created equal.’” “We organize small groups to study the Constitution and its history,” Bailey says. “We tell stories about America in a way to try to connect with people who haven’t heard them.” Students who attend classes, as well as those who learn remotely, are also encouraged to take part in monthly service projects: “Instead of waiting for the government to do things, Bailey says, “we teach students to act on their own initiative.” A trip to the nation’s capital began as a recruiting tool, but is rapidly becoming the centerpiece of their curriculum. “The Washington, D.C., Leadership Summit is an all-expenses-paid program,” Spencer says. “We select participants based on an essay and video competition that focuses on natural rights and the proper role...
  • September 26, 2018

    Understanding America

    Spencer and Bailey Amaral Launch Windrose Project Spencer and Bailey Arlinghaus Amaral, ’14, ’15, aim to teach young Americans about freedom, faith, and virtue through the Windrose Project, a leadership development organization. The project, whose name evokes the directional markings on a compass, sponsors educational seminars, local service projects, and an annual trip to the nation’s capital. Over 2,000 students, ranging in age from 13 to 25, have participated in the project in Chicago, Dallas, Houston, and Los Angeles. Bailey launched the project in 2015 in Texas—where Spencer was enrolled in Dallas Theological Seminary—as a way to teach civics outside the school system. Spencer joined the project in 2016, and soon realized he was in an entirely new teaching environment. “Regardless of whether we’re teaching immigrants or those who were born here, many of our students don’t understand what it means to be an American, because they weren’t taught civics,” Spencer says. “We explore big themes, such as why America is unique as the first country in the world founded on an idea: ‘All men are created equal.’” “We organize small groups to study the Constitution and its history,” Bailey says. “We tell stories about America in a way to try to connect with people who haven’t heard them.” Students who attend classes, as well as those who learn remotely, are also encouraged to take part in monthly service projects: “Instead of waiting for the government to do things, Bailey says, “we teach students to act on their own initiative.” A trip to the nation’s capital began as a recruiting tool, but is rapidly becoming the centerpiece of their curriculum. “The Washington, D.C., Leadership Summit is an all-expenses-paid program,” Spencer says. “We select participants based on an essay and video competition that focuses on natural rights and the proper role...
 

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